Rosamond Gifford Zoo

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Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow

Ever notice how just washing your hair seems to involve a lot of plastics and harsh chemicals? This week we are discussing “greener” shampoos and conditioners. Would you like to get rid of all the plastic bottles cluttering up your shower?  There are some great ways to do that after you’ve emptied the bottles you have.  Shampoo and conditioner bars are excellent at keeping waste out of your local landfills.  They don’t take up much space in the shower and many come in plastic-free packaging.  Another great option is to use products from companies that use metal or glass containers that can be refilled.  Check out https://www.plaineproducts.com/ for some great options.

Another reason to switch shampoos could be the ingredients in yours. Sodium Laureth Sulfate or Sodium Lauryl Sulfate are chemicals that make your shampoo foamy but can be harmful to wildlife once it goes down the drain!

Several other chemicals in shampoo can actually strip your hair and while it feels “clean,” it could be removing the good oils that your hairneeds to be healthy. Sulfates in your shampoo are very effective at cleaning dirt and oil, but they might be causing harm to your hair.  Dimethicone is an ingredient that makes your hair feel soft, but it actually creates a plastic-like layer on your hair.  It also does not degrade, so when washed down the drain, it can have harmful effects on the environment. Check out www.earthhero.com for all kinds of options and ingredients that are good for you and good for the environment, too. 

Does this all sound a little too overwhelming?  If you aren’t ready to make the switch, you can still make changes to help.  Try only using shampoo a couple of times a week, or only wash your hair every other day.  You will be using less product, and it will take longer for that plastic to end up in the landfill.

 

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