Rosamond Gifford Zoo

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Pink-necked Fruit Dove

Ptilinopus porphyreus

The Pink-necked Fruit Dove is a small, colorful dove. The male has a bright pink-purple head and throat bordered with a white band outlined in greenish black. The female is similar but her coloring is slightly more muted.

Range & Habitat

This species is native to Southeast Asia and the mountain forests of Bali, Sumatra, and Java.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

Although currently listed as Least Concern, the population is in decline due to habitat loss.

Diet

In the Wild – figs, small fruits berries in the upper canopy

At the Zoo – a variety of fruits, berries, and vegetables

Life Span

In the Wild: due to the reclusive nature of this species, data is not readily available.

In Human Care: 20 years

Fun Facts about the Pink-necked Fruit Dove

·         They are also known as the Pink-headed fruit dove or Temminck’s fruit pigeon.

·         They are very shy and it makes them a difficult species to study.

·         The Pink-necked fruit dove’s call is similar to that of the mourning dove.



Sources

Photo courtesy of Toledo Zoo.

BirdLife International (2021) Species factsheet: Ptilinopus porphyreus. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 21/03/2021.

Toledo Zoo. (2021) Pink-Necked Fruit Dove. Accessed on March 21, 2021 at https://www.toledozoo.org/animals.

Sincage, J. (2014). Species Fact Sheets. Temmnick’s Fruit Dove. Accessed on March 21, 2021 at http://aviansag.org/Fact_Sheets/Columbiformes/TFDove.pdf

Van Balen, S., & Nijman, V. (2004). Biology and conservation of Pink-headed Fruit-dove Ptilinopus porphyreus. Bird Conservation International, 14(2), 139-152. doi:10.1017/S0959270904000152. Accessed on March 21, 2021 at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bird-conservation-international/article/biology-and-conservation-of-pinkheaded-fruitdove-ptilinopus-porphyreus/EEE361DCCE731EBF1AA39F7A7C589C69

 

 

 

 

 

Updated August 17, 2021
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